George Clooney 'lucky' not to be typecast
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George Clooney feels "lucky" that he never got "massively successful" in any particular role.

The 'Ocean's Eleven' star may be a Hollywood star but he admits he feels blessed he didn't get famous for one part alone as it has meant he has been able to play many different characters.

He said: "I was lucky in a weird way that as an actor I never got massively successful in anything, you know, in a funny way. I never was - I did an action film like Peacemaker and it wasn’t a hit, if it had been Die Hard, which it wasn’t, then that’s who I would have been. I would have been the action guy. I did One Fine Day, if I’d done romantic comedies and any were a massive hit, I would have been the romantic comedy guy, and then I couldn’t have done drama and the other way I couldn’t have done comedy. Because they weren’t, and if you go through my career a lot of the things weren’t home runs at all, it’s allowed me to do and try other things. I’m allowed to do a comedy or a drama, so I can do something as whacky as O Brother Where Art Thou and something as straight as Michael Clayton."

The 59-year-old actor might have a string of successful films under his belt, but one that didn't do so well was 'Batman & Robin'. George admits it changed his whole approach to his career.

Speaking to BAFTA for their Life In Pictures series, he added: "I'd gotten killed for doing 'Batman & Robin' and I understood for the first time - because quite honestly when I got 'Batman & Robin' I was just an actor getting an acting job and I was excited to play Batman - what I realised after that was that I was going to be held responsible for the movie itself not just my performance or what I was doing. So I knew I needed to focus on better scripts, the script was the most important thing. You can’t make a good film out of a bad script, it’s impossible. You can make a bad film out of a good script."

This article originally ran on celebretainment.com.

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