Dinniman Recognizes 250th Anniversary of Star Gazers' Stone

Senator Dinniman presents a special Senate citation in honor of the 250th anniversary of Star Gazers’ Stone to historical preservationist Linda Kaat.

State Senator Andy Dinniman recently recognized the upcoming 250th Anniversary of Star Gazers’ Stone, the point used to mark the establishment of the Mason-Dixon Line and the border between Pennsylvania and Maryland.

“When you visit Star Gazer’s Stone, you are truly walking in the footsteps of history,” Dinniman said. “And here in Chester County our history is very important to us. It is not simply a hobby, it is an important part of the rich cultural fabric that makes up our communities and holds us together.”

Senator Dinniman presents a special Senate citation in honor of the 250th anniversary of Star Gazers’ Stone to historical preservationist Linda Kaat.

Senator Dinniman presents a special Senate citation in honor of the 250th anniversary of Star Gazers’ Stone to historical preservationist Linda Kaat.

“It is my honor to commemorate the 250th Anniversary of this historic site. In doing so, I also recognize the many volunteers, historians and preservationists who have worked tirelessly to document its history and to ensure that it is preserved for perpetuity,” he added.

Dinniman presented a special Senate citation in honor of the anniversary to members of the Newlin Township Historical Commission and the Newlin Township Board of Supervisors, as well as historical preservationist Linda Kaat, who played a leading role in preserving the site’s history. The 250th Anniversary Celebration of Star Gazers’ Stone coincided with the 17th National Rendezvous, an annual event hosted by the Surveyors Historical Society (SHS).

The stone was set by astronomer Charles Mason and surveyor Jeremiah Dixon, who came to the colonies in 1764 to end an 80-year boundary dispute between Pennsylvania and Maryland. Mason and Dixon set the stone to mark a reference point for their calculations. After five years of work, they established the 233-mile-long boundary line between Pennsylvania and Maryland, and the 83-mile-long north-south boundary between Maryland and present-day Delaware. The feat was known as one of the greatest scientific achievements of the time.

With the beginning of the Civil War and the battle over slavery, the Pennsylvania-Maryland Border, known as the Mason-Dixon Line, represented the unofficial border between the North and South. For many escaped slaves on the Underground Railroad, the stone was a sign that they had finally made it to freedom.