Brandywine's antiques show features weathervanes

Courtesy photo This rooster weathervane is an antique design that was on display at the Brandywine River Museum Antiques Show.

Each year the Brandywine River Museum Antiques Show is aneagerly anticipated event as it is a marvelous party in the Courtyard.

The food is outstanding, the antiques top of the line and all the ladies get to wear their new spring finery. Not this year. The temperature dropped down to the 40s, and those who dressed in their pretty cottons soon turned blue and ran inside the museum to escape the bitter wind.

Once inside, the food was wonderful, with sushi and seafood items on the third floor, roast beef and veggies on the second floor and smoked salmon and heaps of shrimp on the first floor. The display of the large weathervanes necessitated the removal of most of the benches so there was not much space to sit down.

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The antiques were gorgeous, as usual, although I thought there seemed tobe more items that might be considered folk art or country items, which seemed to be more affordable. Among the guests were the usual suspects like Frolic Weymouth, who was looking fit, curator Amanda Burden, who had assembled all the large weathervanes, and Sally and Jim Duff, whose house in Maine was recently featured in one of the regional magazines.

It was good to see David Iams formerly of the Philadelphia Inquirer, antique connoisseur Carol Wareand longtime museum supporters Sylvia and Peter Davenport.

“Which Way the Wind Blows: Antique American Weathervanes,” the large decorative arts display of weathervanes, was fascinating. The first known weathervanewas probably the figure of Triton, messenger of the sea, who was perched on top of the Agora in Athens in the first century B.C.

Weathervanes are designed to be balanced with approximately two-thirds of the mass behind the spindle so that it catches the wind so that it turns it into the directions of the wind. In 1070 the Bayeux Tapestry shows London’s St. Peter’s Abbey, now known as Westminster Abbey, as the burial site of Edward the Confessor in 1066 with a weathercock atop the building.Since then, weathercocks have proliferated throughout the world. Also popular aresheep, pigs and a trotting horse and carriage and its driver. The ones on displayat the museum were in excellent shape; some of those that were gilded were spectacular. The display was enough to make one want to stop the car next time one is spotted.

Once again the Brandywine River Museum produced a beautiful show.

Thought

Two of our local food producers in the area were given some positive media space recently. I first saw a really nice video clip on “The Chew” with Jim Herr ofHerr’s Foods in Nottingham explaining how his potato chips were made. It was beautifully done and he is a good spokesman.

Cirque du Soleil Totem: Then in the AAA World magazine is an informative article about the mushrooms grown in the Kennett area with particular reference to Phillips Mushrooms. The also mention the Mushroom Festival and give a recipe for Pork Pot Sticker Soup with shiitaki and ginger. Congratulations to these well run organizations.

‘Totem’

On May 30 in the blue and yellow big top at the Camden Waterfront, Cirque du Soleil will present its touring show totem. The big tent was raised by a team of more than 60 men and women who spent several hours pounding pegs and hoisting more than 100 support poles so they could unfurl the canvas. This is quite a tent, as it seats more than 2,600 people, takes eight days to do the entire set-up, and it is climate controlled. The tent stands 66 feet high and is 167 feet in diameter with four masts that are 80 feet tall. Totem travels via 64 trailers carrying more than 1,200tons of equipment

The show “Totem” will run May 30 to June 30

It has been seen by more than 2 million people in Canada, The Netherlands, the United States and the United States. The New York Times said, “What’s the next level after impressed?Amazed? Awe-struck? Whatever it is, that emotion arrives often in ‘Totem.’ This is one very sharp show. ‘Totem’ is thrilling!”

The show traces the fascinating journey of the human species from its original amphibian state to its ultimate desire to fly. Inspired by many founding myths “Totem” illustrates through a visual and acrobatic language the evolutionary progress of species.

For tickets go to www.cirquedusoleil.com/totem.

Gardens

Don’t forget, this Saturday, June 1, is the Bayard Taylor Memorial Library Home & Garden Day Tour, and you must have your tickets ahead of time. The proceeds from the tour of these beautiful homes mostly in Unionville fund the children’s programs that served 10,420 children last year and the adult literacy program that served 328 students with 112 volunteers in more than 700 hours of class time. Get your tickets for this beautiful tour at the Library. Tickets are $35.

Helping hand

Last week Bill not only got the rather large tractor stuck in the mud, he knocked down several units of fencing. We decided that I would take the even larger tractor and pull him out of the mud. As I walk with a cane, when I am trying toclimb onto a tall tractor apparently, it is quite a sight. We hitched the two tractors together but I could not drag him out of the sink hole. After several tries getting nowhere we were getting discouraged. Suddenly a pickup truck came into the driveway. Two men from Page Excavating got out and asked if they could help. Could they ever! After hitching the tractor to their truck, the tractor was free and able to move in about a minute. The men explained. “We saw you when we went by on our way to lunch. Then you were still here when we came back. We thought you could use a little help.” In our need, they were friends indeed.

Touch

The Please Touch Museum, Memorial Hall in Fairmount Park has a full schedule of events planned for the summer. On June 1 the dancers and drummers of the Universal African Dance & Drum Ensemble will perform with some amazing stilt walkers at noon and at 2 p.m. On June 2 and 9,magician Tom McDonnell will perform at 11 a.m., 1 and 3 p.m. and on June 8 at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Aspecial music program on June 5 from 4 to 7 p.m. culminating in a concert highlighting Beethoven’s works will be on June 5. Admission at this time will be only $2.

Longwood

The Longwood Art Gallery, 200 E. State St., Kennett Square, will host a reception on Friday, June 7, for the solo show for local artist Joan Hollander during the month of June. Joan is noted for her beautiful beach scenes of children and her hunt scenes. She also has portraits of children and florals. They will have music by The Ladeens. The show will run through June30.

Bonsai

The annual Bonsai Show at the Brandywine Museum will be this weekend June 1 and 2 from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Members of the Brandywine Bonsai Society will be on hand to demonstrate training techniques and answer questions regarding special care. Admission to the show is included in admission ticket but admission is free on Sunday from 9:30 a.m. to noon.

Steam

The Marshall Steak Museum, filled with Stanley Steamer cars and other antique cars, as well as a rideable train one-eighth the size of a real one will be open on the first Sunday of June through November. Located in Hockessin, Del.,the collection of cars has 15 Stanley Steamers, two 1939 Packard touring cars and 1909 electric cars. If you have never ridden the train it is well worth the trip. Tours of the 1897 Victorian Mansion are available with an additional ticket.

Blue Star

Nine of the 11 leading museums in the area have been designated as Blue Star Museums. This designates them as offering free admissions to active military personnel and an additional five members of their family from May 27 through Sept. 2. Longwood Gardens has year round military discounts and Mt. Cuba Center has special free days.

For non-military families the Brandywine Museum and Gardens Alliance offers the Brandywine Treasure Trail Passport that gives access to all 11 museums once during the summer. For information go to brandywinetreasures.org.

Expo

Don’t forget the Senior EXPO will be this Thursday, May30, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Red Clay Room at the Kennett Fire House. There will be free admission, refreshments, health screenings and door prizes.

Strawberries

If you are looking for a fun outing, you might consider going to the Longview Farm and Market, 3215 Stump Hill Road, Collegeville. They will have strawberry picking Tuesday through Friday from 9 a.m.to 6 p.m. and Sundays 10 a.m.to 5 p.m. through June, followed by picking of other fruits and vegetables through the summer. On Saturday and Sundays between 9 a.m. to noon, they serve All You Can Eat Strawberry pancakes for $5 per person.

They also have on the premises rare breeds of San Clemente Island goats, white Shetland sheep and Glouster Spot and Berkshire pigs. As weather plays a large part in picking it is recommended that you call before going at 267-254-6119.

‘Sligo’

This oddly name play by Adam Rapp will have its regional premiere at Adrienne Theatre Skybox, 2030 Sansom St., Philadelphia, with opening night Saturday, June 1 at 8 p.m. This dark comedy is about the Sligo working class family on the eve of the final fight of all-star, wrestling legend of Art “Crazy Train” Sligo. He is at dinner with his two slacker sons, his colorful sister-in-law and his biggest fan as a few unexpected guests arrive. Sparks fly and things just keep going wrong until we get a clear view of gritty realism mixed with the twisted values of the Sligo household. Tickets are $10 - $35 from 215-563-7500

Golf

It is apt that The Media Theatre will present the show “Murder on the 16th Fairway” June 5 through 16, as this is Golf Month in Media as the US Open will be held at the Merion Golf Club. This tells the story of Ryan’s Way Country Club, an exclusive golf club, dining and fitness facility. Chaos ensues when a dead body is discovered in Fader’s Bog, part of the signature hole number 16. As the investigation begins, so does the blame game. The first week includes special guest narrator Jim “Sports” Kelly of ESPN and the Golf Channel.

For tickets call 610-891-0100.

Candlelight

That marvelous little theatre that is always entertaining has a lineupof several different types of theatre. They will be performing that tender hearted play “Driving Miss Daisy” for eight performances June 8 through June 23. It’s a real bargain at $25 that includes a dessert buffet with the show. On this Friday, May 31 they have “Broad’s Way” with show stopping numbers from Broadway. On Saturday, June 1 they have “Bill Haley and the Comets” at $45 for a full dinner and the show. The murder mystery “Lucy, I’m Dead” will be performed on June 7, with a full dinner. They will present the wildly funny “Once upon a Kingdom” by Just Drag! On June 14 for $25, which includes light fare. For tickets call 302-475-2313.

Media

The Media Theatre, 104 E. State St., is offering a new attraction this weekend when the International Opera Theatre will present “Jago.” Inspired by the characters in Shakespeare’s “Othello,” this American premiere will showcase the opera composed by Carlo Pedini of Italy, has the librettist, musical director and two lead singers from Italy. Performances will be May 30, 31 and June 1 at 8 p.m. Tickets are $49 -$75 from 610-891-0100.

Kennett Flash

FILM – “Side Effects” – May 30 at 7:30 p.m. This is a mystery drama with many twists and turns.

LIVE – Alexander Claffy – May 31 at 8 p.m., Known as a musician who plays bassand asan actor.

Dan Orlando –June 1 at 8 p.m, – and his “Band of Hopefuls” new album

Syd Straw – June 8 – first became known with the Golden Palominos, and now has another album that has been well received.

Caryl Huffaker lives in Kennett Township.