Two long-time supervisors, Eddie Caudill and Robert Weer, honored in East Marlborough

MATT FREEMAN - DIGITAL FIRST MEDIARobert Weer (holding citation) with other township officials at his last board meeting as an East Marlborough Township supervisor.
MATT FREEMAN - DIGITAL FIRST MEDIARobert Weer (holding citation) with other township officials at his last board meeting as an East Marlborough Township supervisor.

East Marlborough >> Reagan was President and cell phones were brick-sized playthings of the rich when Robert Weer and Eddie Caudill came on the East Marlborough Township Board of Supervisors.

But time brings changes. Weer had planned to retire this year, and Caudill was outvoted in last month’s election. So last night the supervisors recognized the long service provided by the two men. Caudill was having surgery and was unable to attend, but Weer’s well-wishers set up a well-attended reception before the meeting to recognize his 50 years of service, 30 as a supervisor and a previous 20 on the school board.

Once the official monthly supervisors’ meeting started, Weer told the crowd that it had been an honor and a privilege to serve on the board, and he spoke of his appreciation for the help and friendship from supervisors present and past, township employees, and the citizens of the township. Weer particularly mentioned the public sewer system and the park in Unionville as township endeavors he had been pleased to be part of. Richard Hannum, chairman of the supervisors, thanked both Weer and Caudill, who was a supervisor for 32 years, for their service. He said they would be taking a tremendous amount of experience and knowledge with them, but he added with a smile that the supervisors knew where to find them. Hannum read proclamations in honor of the two supervisors’ service sent by Eric Roe, the local state representative. In other business, the supervisors approved a final plan for CJK/Longwood Preserve, a proposed 150-unit townhouse development on a 32-acre tract along Schoolhouse Road. The developers and township officials had spent the last few months looking at various issues involved with the development, with the final one being a problem with sight distance at the entrance. At a previous meeting, the supervisors and developer had talked about moving the entrance to a more advantageous spot by getting an easement from a neighbor that would help work around a setback requirement. But the developers, speaking through their attorney John Jaros, said their preferred solution was to raise Schoolhouse Road for about a 200-foot stretch south of the entrance. This would solve the sight problem created by a crest in the road, and allow motorists turning left out of the development to see if cars were approaching from their right. Jaros said the plan was to raise portions of the stretch as much as six inches, but to feather it out to about two inches or so on either end. Several area residents asked if the township could also have stop signs put in at the intersection or elsewhere to slow traffic in the area. Township Engineer Jim Hatfield said the area doesn’t currently meet PennDOT criteria for making such a change, but with neighbors bringing new information about potentially dangerous conditions, the township could discuss the situation with its traffic engineers. In other business, the supervisors approved a $2,450,251.61 budget for 2018. No new taxes are proposed.